Tag Archive - NFPA

Don’t Mess Around With Combustible Dust

National Fire Protection Agency

Combustible dust.  It is an explosion hazard that is not to be taken lightly.  Though OSHA seems to be stalling on the rule-making process when it comes to combustible dust, the National Fire Protection Association (NFPA) is not leaving the issue alone.

Combustible dust is any combustible material that can burn quickly when it is in a finely divided form.  Metals, plastics, and even some foods can be explosive in dust form.  Since combustible dust is a hazard that can be found in many industries, it is important that workers be aware of its risks and stay informed on how to protect themselves. Continue Reading…

Carhartt FR Styles Compliant with Flame-Resistance Standards

Carhartt FR Compliant Clothing

Several styles of Carhartt fire-resistant clothing available at Working Person’s Store have been put through rigorous testing and have come out on top as being approved to meet or exceed various flame-resistance standards.

Carhartt shirt styles FRS160 and WFRS160 are certified to meet the NFPA 2112 Standard on Flame-Resistant Garments for Protection of Industrial Personnel Against Flash Fire, 2007 Edition.  Continue Reading…

Tecasafe NFPA Compliant Workwear from Revco Industries

FR Clothing Made From Tecasafe

The people at Revco Industries out of Santa Fe Springs, CA have taken reins on the competition with an improvement to their Tecasafe Plus high performance flame-resistant clothing. The company is excited to announce their flame resistant shirt and coveralls remain NFPA compliant for arc flash protection but are now also certified NFPA 2112 compliant by UL. This new certification means Black Stallion work wear, which is a brand under Revco Industries, is now suitable for use in the oil and gas industry. Continue Reading…

Voluntary vs Mandatory Safety Guidelines: Does it Matter?

What’s the difference between a mandatory regulation and a voluntary requirement? That’s a big question to answer and an important one to tackle. Understanding the difference can be difficult, but it also might not be necessary. Because understanding what “voluntary” means when it comes to workplace safety might not be as “voluntary” as you might think. Companies that have a correct understanding of what OSHA’s expectations are regarding voluntary requirements will be a leader when it comes to keeping workers safe and costs under control. Continue Reading…

Metal Zippers Versus Snaps on Fire Resistant Workwear

Metal Zipper Use In Workwear

Q: Are metal zippers and snaps on FR workwear unsafe for electrical workers, and are the prohibited by NFPA 70E or ASTM 1506 regulations?

A: Let’s take a look at those two regulations:

NFPA 70E

There is only one reference to metal components such as zippers or snaps in NFPA 70E, and it is in Section 130.6 (D):
Conductive Articles Being Worn. Continue Reading…

Arc Thermal Protective Value (ATPV) and More

arc incident energy

If you loved alphabet soup as a child, you’ll love this. Our old friends at ASTM decided on an arc test method to help you decide on the relative safety of flame-resistant garments to protect you from the heat and flame by-products of an arc flash accident.  (This has nothing to do with electric shock protection.) An arcing fault can release tremendous amounts of concentrated radiant energy in a small fraction of a second. You get incredibly high temperatures in a pressure blast, possibly hurling debris over 700 miles per hour (yes, faster than your last commercial plane ride). You don’t want to be there without good protection. Continue Reading…

How to Detect Flammable and Combustible Liquids

Detecting Flammable Liquid

It’s a question that baffles many. It’s also the most common question when training: Why is it that that I’m getting a combustible gas reading on my instrument now, when I didn’t earlier today? The answer is not as complicated as you might think. First of all, a there is a common misunderstanding about when combustible gasses can be detected.

It is important to understand that flammable and combustible liquids are two different things. As defined by the NFPA, a flammable liquid is defined as a liquid whose flashpoint does not exceed 100 degrees fareheit when tested by closed-cup test methods, while a combustible liquid is one whose flashpoint is 100 degrees farenheit or higher. These two differences can actually be further classified into six groups: Continue Reading…

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