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Proper Care and Prevention of Corns

WPS Corn Care

It’s amazing how a tiny little bump of skin on your foot can cause so much pain and discomfort. If you’ve ever had a corn on your foot, you know how unpleasant it can be. Corns are preventable, but if you do have the unfortunate occurrence of getting one, they are also treatable.

Corns are thick, hardened pieces of dead skin, and they usually occur on the tops and sides of toes. They can make walking very painful. They develop because of rubbing and friction and pressure on the skin. Some corns are caused by an improper walking motion, but most corns are caused by wearing shoes that don’t fit properly. Some corns also occur on the bottom of the feet and some doctors believe this is caused by blocked sweat ducts.

So in order to prevent corns from occurring in the first place, the best course of action is to make sure your shoes or boots fit properly. Make sure you have the proper size and that they are not too wide or too narrow, or fit too tightly. If you can’t wiggle your toes in your shoes or boots, they are too tight. Also, keep in mind that your feet might not be exactly the same size. You might need two different sized shoes or boots. Continue Reading…

ESD Footwear: Keeping you Safe in Electrical Environments

timberland esd shoes

Static dissipative footwear (ESD) is designed to protect you against hazards, due to really low footwear resistance, while keeping a high enough level of resistance to reduce the possibility of electric shock. And to qualify, the footwear has to have a lower limit of electrical resistance of 106 ohms and an upper limit of 108 ohms.

Put simply, ESD work boots reduce the amount of static electricity that can build up in your body.  But unlike Electrical Hazard (EH) work boots, ESD boots can be either steel toed or soft.  They actually conduct static electricity through the linings, the insole, outsole, and into the ground.

And so you can be sure what you’re pulling onto your feet before you set out to work, ESD shoes or boots will have an “SD” clearly visible on the ASTM label sewn inside them.

But there are some pretty tight rules around modifying, or altering your ESD work boots too.  First, you can’t add your own insole to the shoe because unless it’s explicitly an ESD insole, static electricity can’t flow through it. Also as a guide to keeping safe, try to keep the floor and the bottom of your ESD work boots as clean and free from dust as possible, this means the static electricity can dissipate properly, flowing straight through the sole and into ground. Continue Reading…

Take Proper Care of Your FR Clothing

FR clothing care

It’s obvious what flame-resistant clothes do to take care of you. You know, protect you from flames. But it’s not always obvious how you’re supposed to take care of your flame resistant clothing. How to wash it, dry it, and keep it in good condition. It’ll last much longer if it is properly cared for, and it will also retain its flame-resistant properties much better. So here’s some good instructions:

When it comes to laundering flame-resistant cotton clothing, ASTM F1449-01 has several recommendations. It’s important to realize that some laundering procedures can damage for FR clothes. Hard water and high temperatures that are used in industrial laundering and drying can cause minerals to build up on cotton fabrics and make them flammable. The harder the water, the more minerals build up, the more flammable your flame-resistant clothes become. But this can be prevented. Using soft water or an adequate soap can keep minerals from building up, and thus, keep your flame-resistant clothes flame-resistant. Continue Reading…

Stay Safe in the Heat!

Heat safety

Summer’s coming, so we thought it was about the right time to share what we know about keeping cool at work, as the temperature rises. It’s all too easy to think that all you need to do is lather on the suntan lotion and you’re good to get out there, but it’s not always that simple.

Although a lot of jobs are outdoors and do require that you take plenty of precautions if you’re going to be exposed to the sun all day, a bigger danger present in most lines of work is heat stress. And that can happen outdoors, working on the construction sites, in maintenance, landscaping and agriculture, but it is an indoor problem too. If you work in commercial kitchens, laundries or factories, you need to take care this summer. Why? Well according to OSHA, thousands of workers fall ill with heat stress every year. And if its not taken seriously, it can even kill. Continue Reading…

Stay Safe, Stay Cool

Occunomix cooling bandana

The summer’s coming, we promise. No seriously, it’s right around the corner – it’ll be here before you know it. And that’s great, right? Well yes, and no.

If you’re hanging out by the pool, then great! Whenever you get too hot, you jump right in. But then again, when you’re out on the job, at work on the site or generally exposed to the sun and heat all day without a proper break, it’s a different ball game altogether.  Continue Reading…

Protect Yourself From Water and Flame with FR Rain Gear

frraingear

When working in an industrial workplace, it is quite common for safety risks and hazards to be diverse.  Oftentimes there isn’t just one hazard to be cautious of, but many.  For example, ASTM F2733-09 the Standard Specification for Flame Resistant Rainwear for Protection Against Flame Hazards is a standard that is important to look for when purchasing workwear when your work puts you in a situation where you can be exposed to wet weather conditions and hydrocarbon and/or petrochemical industrial fires. Continue Reading…

Safety First, Comfort Too

OSHA

If you’ve ever worked in the oil or natural gas industries, we don’t have to tell you how dangerous simply showing up to work can be. These jobs involve some of the most hazardous industrial conditions in any workplace, anywhere. Since the job sites are typically outdoors, are typically in remote areas of the country, and often operate year round regardless of weather conditions, there are all sorts of things that can and do go wrong on the job: Environmental hazards caused by extreme weather, machine accidents, materials hazards, chemicals hazards and more.

Continue Reading…

Flammable Liquids in the Workplace: The Three Key Characteristics

National Fire Protection Agency

Whether they come in aerosol cans, drums, totes or portable tanks, flammable liquids are commonly found in the workplace, as such in the oil and gas industries.  While they help us to perform a variety of essential tasks such as cleaning, fueling and manufacturing, they can also pose serious physical hazards to those who are working with or around them.  This is why it is important to know how to identify a flammable liquid by looking at the safety data sheet for the three key physical and chemical characteristics: flash point, flammable or explosive range and boiling point. Continue Reading…

Heat Stress Prevention: Monitors Make Sense To Use

prevent-heat-stress

Here’s something to think about: Heat Stress is expensive. A 2010 study in the state of Washington found that the average cost of a heat-related illness claim was $3,682. There were 483 of these claims. That adds up quick. Here are some more startling statistics: From 2003-08, the U.S. Department of Labor found that there were not only 177 deaths caused by “Exposure to Environmental Heat” in the private workforce, but also 13,580 missed days of work for the same reason. That’s a lot of losst productivity. Obviously, the safety and well-being of your employees comes before any measure of money. That certainly goes without saying. But there’s no denying that preventing heat stress not only is good for the health of your employees, but also for the health of your company’s bottom line. Continue Reading…

On the Job Mining Deaths at a Record Low

Mine Safety Regulation

The mining industry has made enormous strides in safety this past year.  According to the Mine Safety and Health Administration (MSHA), fatality and injury rates in the mining industry were the lowest in history.

The 2012 mining fatality rate was .0107 deaths per 200,000 hours worked and the rate of reported injuries was 2.56 per 200,000 hours worked.  The mining industry had achieved record lows in 2011 and has now successfully shattered those records with lower rates in 2012.

The number of mines in the U.S. has decreased slightly in 2012, but the number of miners actually increased from 381,209 to 387,671.  35 miners died on the job in 2012 which ties the record low number of deaths in mining achieved in 2009.  19 of those fatalities were in coal mining, the second lowest number of fatalities in coal mining ever.  The other 16 deaths occurred in metal and nonmetal mining.

While improvements to mining safety have been immense, it is still important for those working in mines to always be mindful of safety policies and to wear and use appropriate safety apparel and equipment.  To shop for the best in high-quality work wear, visit Working Person’s Store today!

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